Weekend Reading

weekend-readingphoto: Vinoth Chandar, Creative Commons

Each weekend I love to leave you with a list of the best things I have read on the Internet because, well, sometimes, you just need something great to read. I’m so excited to share these articles with you, and I hope you enjoy them as much as I did.

If you read something great this week, leave me a note in the comments. And mostly, enjoy your weekend. Do something awesome!

11 Resolutions for A Better You | Joshua Becker

Since I shared that my resolution this year is to be nice to myself this year, I bet you can see how this list is congruent with that goal. I especially want to focus on number 11—determining and allowing myself to be happy.

How to Live Dangerously | Jon Acuff

This thought surprised me and made me think. What are the areas of my life where I can use “safety” as leverage to do something a little more dangerous?

Next Resolution: Become ‘Person of the Year’ | Matt Appling

Pope Francis was voted Time Magazines Person of the Year and it’s not hard to discover why. What would it take for you to be voted “person of the year” in 2014? I like the unexpected twist of this article, and think I’ll try to be a “Person of the Year” in my own way, to as many people as possible, in the next 12 months.

A Simple Way to Create Lasting Memories | Tim Schurrer (via Storyline Blog)

I absolutely love this, and watching the snapshot of Tim’s memories from 2013 makes me smile. I’m downloading the app and getting started on my year of memories right now.

Accuracy, Resilience and Denial | Seth Godin

Consider these three different ways to look at your new year—accuracy (or optimism, basically assuming you’re going to win), resilience (an assurance you’ll be “okay,” no matter what happens), or denial (assuming tomorrow will be the same as today). Which will you choose this year? I especially like Seth’s warning about the two mistakes most people tend to make.

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